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  1. #1
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    Hybrid vs Non Hybrid - Cost benefit analysis (Civic)

    From original thread: http://www.bimmerboost.com/showthrea...Technology-NOW!

    LOL You made me do this, I was thinking to myself, how much is the difference....so yeah...here you go.
    THIS IS A HYBRID COST BENEFIT ANALYSIS NOT ELECTRIC
    Cost of gas @ $4/gal
    $1090-civic hybrid 44mpg @ 12k/yr
    costs 24050

    Cost of gas @ $4/gal
    $1432-civic sedan @ 33.5mpg @ 12k/yr
    costs 15805

    Difference in gas savings per year @ $4/gallon = $342

    Difference in price between hybrid and normal (base models) = $8245

    Years needed to compensate price differential @ average of $342 a year =24.1 years

    I'm sure you see where I'm going with this. This was just a simple example with civic, I'm sure other cars will be different.


    Some may complain that the hybrids come more pampered than the base civics, so let's see what it may be with a fully loaded hybrid vs fully loaded non-hybrid:

    Fully loaded Hybrid @ $26300
    Fully loaded Civic Non-hybrid @ $24205

    Cost difference $2095

    @ average of $342 a year, years needed to compensate price variance: 6.1 years


    Ok so let's see what hte price would have to be in order to get the hybrid to be cost efficient:

    scenario A) base models
    Price of Hybrid + G (variable of gas price) * (12,000/44mpg hybrid) = Price of non-hybrid +G (variable of gas price) * (12,000/33.5mpg non-hybrid)
    24050+272G=15805+358G
    8245=86G
    Solve for G gives us = $95/gallon

    Yeah, @ $95/gallon, it would be more cost efficient to buy a hybrid @ the base prices.

    Scenario B)Fully loaded models
    Price of Hybrid + G (variable of gas price) * (12,000/44mpg hybrid) = Price of non-hybrid +G (variable of gas price) * (12,000/33.5mpg non-hybrid)
    26300+272G=24205+358G

    With this, it comes to a reasonable $24/gallon.

    I'll let you guys come to your own conclusions Click here to enlarge

    For those wondering about the electrics, the Nissan leaf will be anywhere between $28k to $35k.
    @ 28k, say we have ~$4k (this is the loaded civic sedan @ 24k) so optimally, it would be about 4 years to compensate minus the costs of electricity(cents per KW)

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    Although from a pure cost perspective I would agree that hybrids don't make sense yet, another variable to consider is the tax breaks you receive.
    Click here to enlarge

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    Click here to enlarge Originally Posted by SSDD Click here to enlarge
    Although from a pure cost perspective I would agree that hybrids don't make sense yet, another variable to consider is the tax breaks you receive.
    How much is the tax break for hybrids? I just looked them up for electrics and it is up to $7500! Surprising to say the least. But another thing to consider is the availability of "electric gas stations" and the range/time needed to recharge.

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    Click here to enlargeHybrid cars

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    lol, I just remembered the same issue when they first appeared....not any cheaper so why buy them?

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    Let the early adopters and tree huggers eat the development costs of hybrid technologies.

    The technologies will only get cheaper as time goes on.

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    Click here to enlarge Originally Posted by M3_WC Click here to enlarge
    Let the early adopters and tree huggers eat the development costs of hybrid technologies.

    The technologies will only get cheaper as time goes on.
    That is what one can hope....just time will determine how long this takes...I mean with the government coughing up $7500 on breaks...i'm sure the margin is probably high.

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    I really don't get why we should have Hybrid cars !
    it's not cheap to build, it's not cheap to run, it's not fast.
    plus it's not green either, for electricity we burn coal which is far dirtier than gasoline, or it comes from a nuclear power plant which is going to explode someday.

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    Click here to enlarge Originally Posted by Sorena Click here to enlarge
    I really don't get why we should have Hybrid cars !
    it's not cheap to build, it's not cheap to run, it's not fast.
    plus it's not green either, for electricity we burn coal which is far dirtier than gasoline, or it comes from a nuclear power plant which is going to explode someday.
    hybrids are marginally faster since they have electric motors. full tq off the line. I don't know if hybrids are the answer, but we definitely need to find an alternative source of energy to power our resource hungry cars.

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    Click here to enlarge Originally Posted by DarkPhantom Click here to enlarge
    hybrids are marginally faster since they have electric motors. full tq off the line. I don't know if hybrids are the answer, but we definitely need to find an alternative source of energy to power our resource hungry cars.
    Hydrogen, the answer is Hydrogen.
    everyone switched to EV cars but like i said in the first place, everyone again will return to Hydrogen.
    for now it's really expensive to get liquid H2 but in future it will be much easier and also you can find H2 everywhere.
    it really is the answer, you get liquid Hydrogen from water, fill your tank with it and eventually instead of creating CO2, car gives H2O.

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    http://www.engadget.com/2011/05/03/w...-hand-to-mout/

    I lol'd.

    100 mile range eV that costs $33k? OKAY.

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